In the West Country, a mysterious and potent manifestation of the witch-father is the Bucca. This deity was known throughout the British Isles by the following names:
Bwca, Puca, Puck, Buckie, Bec, Becco, Bouc, Boucan, Bucca, Bucka, and Buc
This dual gendered figure is composed of dark and light virtues. Here we have Bucca Gwidder, meaning ‘white Bucka’, and Bucca Dhu, meaning ‘black Bucka’. As such these dualities are also associated with the weather and the seasons; Bucca Gwidder being associated with fair weather and the summer months, and Bucca Dhu being associated with storms and the dark of the year. It is interesting to note that during storms the Bucca Dhu is said to be riding out on his dark steed and pack of hounds, which likens him to both the Devil of English folklore and with the All-Father, Odin.

In the West Country, a mysterious and potent manifestation of the witch-father is the Bucca. This deity was known throughout the British Isles by the following names:

Bwca, Puca, Puck, Buckie, Bec, Becco, Bouc, Boucan, Bucca, Bucka, and Buc

This dual gendered figure is composed of dark and light virtues. Here we have Bucca Gwidder, meaning ‘white Bucka’, and Bucca Dhu, meaning ‘black Bucka’. As such these dualities are also associated with the weather and the seasons; Bucca Gwidder being associated with fair weather and the summer months, and Bucca Dhu being associated with storms and the dark of the year. It is interesting to note that during storms the Bucca Dhu is said to be riding out on his dark steed and pack of hounds, which likens him to both the Devil of English folklore and with the All-Father, Odin.

(via littlecitywitch)